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Frequently Asked Questions

 

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Wouldn't a recording work just as well as live music?

Certainly recorded music is an excellent complement to any environment. Live music, however, has the advantage of having richer vibrations that affect the patient physically, and the practitioner can customize the music to the immediate and changing condition of the patient.

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How long is a typical session with a music practitioner?

Generally a session lasts from 20-30 minutes, depending on the needs of the patient.

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How do I locate a practitioner to play for my loved one?

Music Partners in Healthcare maintains a list of local Certified Music Practitioners. For referrals, contact us directly.

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I do not live in the Sacramento area. How can I find out if the hospitals in my area have Certified Music Practitioners?

Certified Music Practitioners can be located nationwide on an internet directory provided by the Music for Healing and Transition Program at: www.mhtp.org.

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How do I become a member of Music Partners in Healthcare?

In order to become a member, you must have obtained certification from a program that is accredited by the National Standards Board for Therapeutic Musicians. Many of our members received their training from the Music for Healing and Transition Program which offers classes in Northern California.

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How do I support this work?

Donations can be made via PayPal from this website or by mail.

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What is the difference between a Music Practitioner and a Music Therapist?

Both Board Certified Music Therapists and Certified Music Practitioners have a common goal of using music to help. However, the training and the methods and goals differ. The practices are compatible, and in some locations Music Therapists and Music Practitioners work side by side, meeting the needs of patients in differing conditions.

Music Therapy is a four-year college degree focused on using music as a tool for specific physical or psychological goals. It may be a tool to help a child learn to talk or walk, to help a stroke victim regain mobility, or to facilitate acceptance and closure at end of life. Music Therapists may use live or recorded music in their sessions. They have specific patient goals, treatment plans, and documented outcomes. The practice is highly interactive.

Music Practitioners receive training through credentialed organizations and receive a certification for the use of therapeutic music. Music Practitioners only use live music, meeting the needs of the patient in the moment and adjusting the music as the patient's needs change. The patient need not actively interact with the practitioner and often the outcome may be that the patient relaxes and falls asleep. Even comatose patients may hear and benefit from the practitioner's music.

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